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Fees and Funding

Your Guide to Fees and Funding

When the time comes to choose a care home, you’ll need to know how much it will cost and any care funding you’re entitled to. You'll learn: - How funding works in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland - Assessing your care needs - Where to go for further information

fees and funding care homes

FREE Guide to Fees and Funding

Care Home Fees and Funding

Naturally the cost of care is a concern for those considering moving into a home and also for their loved ones.

Ultimately the cost each individual Four Seasons resident will be asked to pay will depend on the fees that apply in their chosen care home and their financial circumstances ─ which will determine the amount of financial support they will receive.

The costs of staying in a care home are usually in three parts:

Nursing care - this will be provided by a qualified nurse. These costs are only charged to those whose conditions require medical care and the NHS will usually cover

Personal care - some residents do not need constant nursing care, but simply need help with everyday tasks like dressing, eating and washing. This support is provided by a carer

Accommodation - including food, heating and living costs. The manager at a person’s chosen care home will discuss all fees before admission.

In some cases, there is financial assistance available for those moving into, or helping a loved one move into, a care home. It's important to understand what that help is and how to get it.

The person’s needs and circumstances will be assessed

When someone is considering moving into a care home there will usually be a clinical assessment to decide the right type of care package for their needs. There will also be a financial assessment to work out what contribution if any that person will be asked to make towards their care.

Four Seasons residents may be entitled to help with the cost of their care

If someone has been assessed as needing a care home place, how much help they receive will depend on how much capital they have. Capital is the total of any annual income including pensions and any assets the person owns such as savings, shares, premium bonds and in some cases the value of their home. 

The rules for funding may be slightly different depending on where you live, so please select from the locations below for a guide to who pays for care.

  • Fees and Funding in England

    If their capital is below £14,250…

    They will be entitled to support with the full cost of their care. They must however contribute most of the income they receive (such as any state or other pension) towards their care costs. They will be able to keep £23.90 per week from this income to cover their personal expenses.

    If their capital is between £14,250 and £23,250…

    They should be entitled to some financial support from their local authority.

    They will however be required to make a contribution which is normally £1 per week for every £250 of capital they have between the two amounts.

    Example:  If they have £17,250 capital, they will be asked to pay £12 per week towards your care.

    If their capital is more than £23,250…

    In most cases residents are expected to pay privately for their care home fees.

    If a local authority is paying for some or all of a person’s care, they can still choose where in England they want to live

    Someone can move into a home in a different county to the one paying their fees, provided certain conditions are met. The home should meet the person’s needs as assessed by the local authority, meet the authority’s care criteria and not cost any more than the authority would usually pay.

    What if the preferred home has fees higher than the local authority will pay for?

    Residents may be able to top up the fees through a third party, such as a member of their family. Residents are not allowed to top up the fees themselves if their capital is below £23,250, as their financial assessment will have already decided what they can afford..

    The cost of nursing care

    If a resident is assessed as needing nursing care, then the NHS will contribute to those costs, whether it’s the person or the local authority paying the remainder of the care fees. This is called the registered nursing care contribution (RNCC) and it is paid by the NHS to the care home either directly or via your local authority.

    If a resident is in a care home because their nursing needs are very high, or they need full-time nursing care due to a long-term medical condition, then that person may be eligible to have all their care fees paid for by the NHS through its fully funded continuing care. This will be decided during a resident’s assessment for nursing costs.

    Useful Contacts

    Department of Health

    Tel: 0800 882200 or www.direct.gov.uk

    Age UK

    Tel: 0800 1696565 or www.ageuk.org.uk

    Independent Age

    Tel: 0800 3196789 or www.independentage.org

    SAGA Care Funding Advice

    Tel: 0800 0567996 or www.saga.co.uk/ltc

  • Fees and Funding in Scotland

     

    If their capital is below £16,000…

    They will be entitled to support with the full cost of their care, known as publicly funded care. They must however contribute most of the income they receive (such as any state or other pension) towards their care costs. They will be able to keep a certain amount per week from this income to cover their personal expenses.

    If their capital is between £16,000 and £26,000…

    They should be entitled to some financial support from their local authority.

    The contribution will normally be £1 per week for every £250 of capital they have between the two amounts.

    Example:  If they have £20,000 capital, they will be asked to pay £16 per week towards your care.

    If their capital is more than £26,000…

    In most cases a resident will be expected to pay privately for their care home fees unless they have any entitlement to free personal or nursing care which will be discussed during the initial assessment.

    If a local authority is paying for some or all of a person’s care, they can still choose where in Scotland they want to live

    Someone can move into a home in a different county to the one paying their fees, provided certain conditions are met. The home should meet the person’s needs as assessed by the local authority, meet the authority’s care criteria and not cost any more than the authority would usually pay.

    What if the preferred home has fees higher than the local authority will pay for?

    Residents may be able to top up the fees through a third party, such as a member of their family. Residents are not allowed to top up the fees themselves if their capital is below £26,000, as their financial assessment will have already decided what they can afford..

    The cost of nursing care

    If a resident is assessed as needing nursing care, then the NHS will contribute to those costs, whether it’s the person or the local authority paying the remainder of the care fees. This is called the registered nursing care contribution (RNCC) and it is paid by the NHS to the care home either directly or via your local authority.

    If a resident is in a care home because their nursing needs are very high, or they need full-time nursing care due to a long-term medical condition, then that person may be eligible to have all their care fees paid for by the NHS through its fully funded continuing care. This will be decided during a resident’s assessment for nursing costs.

    Useful Contacts

    Department of Health

    Tel: 0800 882200 or www.direct.gov.uk

    Age Scotland - Age UK

    Tel: 0800 12 44 222 or www.ageuk.org.uk/scotland/

    Independent Age

    Tel: 0800 3196789 or www.independentage.org

    SAGA Care Funding Advice

    Tel: 0800 0567996 or www.saga.co.uk/ltc

  • Fees and Funding in Wales

    If a local authority is paying for some or all of a person’s care, they can still choose where in Wales they want to live

    Someone can move into a home in a different county to the one paying their fees, provided certain conditions are met. The home should meet the person’s needs as assessed by the local authority, meet the authority’s care criteria and not cost any more than the authority would usually pay.

    What if the preferred home has fees higher than the local authority will pay for?

    Residents may be able to top up the fees through a third party, such as a member of their family. Residents are not allowed to top up the fees themselves if their capital is below a certain amount, as their financial assessment will have already decided what they can afford. Your local authority will be able to advise you.

    The cost of nursing care

    If a resident is assessed as needing nursing care, then the NHS will cover those costs, whether it’s the person or the local authority paying the remainder of the care fees. This is called the registered nursing care contribution (RNCC) and it is paid by the NHS to the care home either directly or via your local authority.

    If a resident is in a care home because their nursing needs are very high, or they need full-time nursing care due to a long-term medical condition, then that person may be eligible to have all their care fees paid for by the NHS through its fully funded continuing care. This will be decided during a resident’s assessment for nursing costs.

    For more information about care home funding in Wales…

    Anyone considering moving into a nursing home should contact their local authority for help and guidance. They may also want to Age UK Cymru for answers to some common questions.

    Managers at any of the Four Seasons homes in Wales are also happy to discuss the costs of care and who will pay for it.

    Whether people decide to become a resident with Four Seasons or at another care home, we strongly advise everyone to seek expert financial help before making any final decisions.

    Useful Contacts

    Department of Health

    Tel: 0800 882200 or www.direct.gov.uk

    Age Cymru

    Tel: 08000 223 444 or www.ageuk.org.uk/cymru/

    Independent Age

    Tel: 0800 3196789 or www.independentage.org

    SAGA Care Funding Advice

    Tel: 0800 0567996 or www.saga.co.uk/ltc

    An online guide to care homes:

    carehome.co.uk

    Balanced advice on how to pay for care       

    payingforcare.org

  • Fees and Funding in Northern Ireland

    If their capital is below £14,250…

    They will be entitled to support with the full cost of their care, known as publicly funded care. They must however contribute most of the income they receive (such as any state or other pension) towards their care costs. They will be able to keep £24.40 per week from this income to cover their personal expenses.

    If their capital is between £14,250 and £23,250…

    They should be entitled to some financial support from their local authority.

    The contribution will normally be £1 per week for every £250 of capital they have between the two amounts.

    Example:  If they have £17,250 capital, they will be asked to pay £12 per week towards your care.

    If their capital is more than £23,250…

    In most cases a resident will be expected to pay privately for their care home fees.

    What if a resident owns your own home?

    Its value will usually be counted as part of a person’s capital for twelve weeks after they move permanently into a care home. The home’s value will not however be counted as capital if certain close relatives of the person still live there.

    If a local authority is paying for some or all of a person’s care, they can still choose where in Northern Ireland they want to live

    Someone can move into a home in a different county to the one paying their fees, provided certain conditions are met. The home should meet the person’s needs as assessed by the local authority, meet the authority’s care criteria and not cost any more than the authority would usually pay.

    What if the preferred home has fees higher than the local authority will pay for?

    Residents may be able to top up the fees through a third party, such as a member of their family. Residents are not allowed to top up the fees themselves if their capital is below £23,250, as their financial assessment will have already decided what they can afford.

    The cost of nursing care

    If a resident is assessed as needing nursing care, then the NHS will contribute to those costs, no matter whether it’s the person or the local authority paying the remainder of the care fees. This is called the registered nursing care contribution (RNCC) and it is paid by the NHS to the care home either directly or via your local authority.

    If a resident is in a care home because their nursing needs are very high, or they need full-time nursing care due to a long-term medical condition, then that person may be eligible to have all their care fees paid for by the NHS through its fully funded continuing care. This will be decided during a resident’s assessment for nursing costs. 

    Useful Contacts

    Department of Health

    Tel: 0800 882200 or www.direct.gov.uk

    Age NI

    Tel: 0808 808 7575 or www.ageuk.org.uk/northern-ireland/

    An online guide to care homes:

    carehome.co.uk

    Balanced advice on how to pay for care       

    payingforcare.org

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